Oxygen airlift links ozone depletion and Greenhouse gas problems

Many people do not know that ozone depletion is considered a cause of global warming as well and it is very significant. The Ozone-Oxygen cycle absorbs UV radiation UVB and UVC. Because the Ozone layer is depleted, this heat is getting through because Ozone is formed by default where UV can get through to oxygen. The reason this causes warming is that when UV hits oxygen or ozone at any altitude, the UV is converted to heat energy. (Madronich). If the reaction happens lower down then because it did not happen higher up, it comes with a heat conversion and heat product.

For every 1% of ozone depletion the calculation has been made that a 2% increase in temperature is happening. It is estimated that the ozone column on average is now 6% depleted in 2018, so that would translate into a 12% temperature rise, which would roughly translate into an average of 1.68 degrees in a world where average warming has already increased the temperature by 1.5 ‘C and is approaching 2’C. Almost all of the warming is accounted for in this simplified way, but the temperature anomaly is not even in distribution because the poles have greater ozone depletion than the tropics, yet we still see a close correlation.

With this kind of an ozone layer depletion baseline, and the addition of the heat being added from elevated methane levels, elevated CO2 we need to be thinking about what can we reverse. So far, with an oxygen airlift to the ozone layer we could reverse the ozone depletion and with enough oxygen, we could destroy significant amounts of methane and significant amounts of  all our synthetic greenhouse gases. Next week (August 25, 2018) we will have the logistics presentation for the oxygen airlift posted, contributed by engineer and contractor, Donald Hugh D’Arcy Evans, from Rushden, UK.

 

 

Call to replace CH2Cl2 with less ozone depleting compounds

A popular industrial solvent, Dichloromethane is damaging the ozone layer over human populations. It’s already listed in the Montreal Protocol as a hazardous substance but it needs to be replaced with greener alternatives. While this solvent is classed as a very short lived substance, it is taking a large toll on the ozone layer.

When we combine this with the loading of atmospheric bromine and for every 5 ppt of that, we have an ozone loss of 1.3% and it could get as high as 350 ppt ( Impact of Very Short-Lived Substances on Stratospheric Bromine Loading, Jan Aschmann Doctoral Dissertation). Just the Bromine releases could wipe out 90% of the ozone layer.
“Several human-produced chlorocarbons not controlled by the Montreal Protocol are present in Earth’s atmosphere. Among the most abundant of these compounds is dichloromethane (CH2Cl2)—an industrial solvent also used as a feedstock in the production of other chemicals, among other applications 13,14. Unlike CFCs, which are virtually inert in the troposphere and have long atmospheric lifetimes (decades to centuries), CH2Cl2 is a so-called very short-lived substance (VSLS)15. Historically, VSLS have been thought to play a minor role in stratospheric ozone depletion due to their relatively short atmospheric lifetimes (typically <6 months) and therefore low atmospheric concentrations. However, substantial levels of both natural and anthropogenic VSLS have been detected in the lower stratosphere 15,16,17,18 and numerical model simulations suggest a significant contribution of VSLS to ozone loss in this region 19,20,21. Long-term measurements of CH2Cl2 reveal that its tropospheric abundance has increased rapidly in recent years 15,21,22,23. For example, between 2000 and 2012, surface concentrations of CH2Clincreased at a global mean rate of almost 8% per year, with the largest growth observed in the Northern Hemisphere (NH)21. Given that natural emissions of CH2Cl2 are small, this recent growth likely reflects an increase in industrial emissions 15. While the precise nature of the source remains poorly characterized, industrial CH2Cl2 emissions from Asia—in particular from the Indian subcontinent—appear to be growing in importance 23”   https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15962

These growth rates are exponential, and we seriously risk another ozone crisis in addition to the one addressed by the Montreal Protocol. In order to reduce the risk, a call to replace dichloromethane with alternatives needs to be made, and upgrade it to at least a partially-banned, controlled substance. If we do not take measures like this in the near term, we run the risk of even more dangerous UV radiation in the environment and cancelling out the benefit we see from the Montreal Protocol.

What’s worse, we run the risk of losing our ozone layer while we watch greenhouse gases and miss this very real risk which could lead to the need for an emergency oxygen airlift to replenish ozone.

Fig2-1

ncomms15962-f1

Observed trends and growth rate of surface CH2Cl2 and simulated stratospheric loading of chlorine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5490265/

Six issues a non toxic oxygen airlift would address

A liquid oxygen airlift and dispersal at the lower stratosphere would address these six issues:

  1. Reduction and removal of synthetic greenhouse gases which are causing 80 ppm of CO2 equivalent warming to the planet.
  2. Ozone depleting substances removal or reduction.
  3. Thickening up the ozone layer, increasing needed UV protection by reducing the relative chlorine, fluorine and bromine fractions.
  4. Methane gas removal which appears to be becoming extremely urgent.
  5. Reduce acceleration of global warming and species extinction.
  6. Slow and may even reverse ice loss.

We have everything to gain and nothing to lose at this point as we wrestle with carbon emissions more slowly than we can afford to.

Airlift Overview

Cost: $50B, Size: 6 million Tonnes of oxygen over 5-10 years. Remember the other alternatives we have; the are toxic or take a very long time.

Oxygen links greenhouse gases and ozone depletion in global warming predicament

Many people do not know that ozone depletion is considered a cause of global warming as well and it is very significant. Ozone absorbs the high heat UV radiation UVB and UVC. Because the layer is depleted, this heat is getting through at 48 times the hotness of infrared radiation.  Dr. Peter L. Ward is a prominent retired Geophysicist who teaches the science behind ozone depletion as the main cause of warming and what he writes highlights this problem as relevant from a physics perspective which is what we need. http://ozonedepletiontheory.info/index.html

If we combine these two theories, greenhouse gas warming and ozone depletion theory, we have the main culprit problems causing global warming and it’s no surprise that it is accelerating. These two theories are both dependent on oxygen to solve their problems. Ozone needs oxygen to form and greenhouse gases need them to be removed by oxidation. Oxygen could be used at the lower stratosphere where the ozone is the most depleted and the greenhouse gases also persist at the same place.

There is possibly twice as much justification for the oxygen airlift because of its links to both of these predicaments.

Solar radiation and volcano activity also influence the temperature, but mankind’s part in this problem may be cataclysmic, so, we may need the man made intervention that can solve both theoretic situations, the oxygen airlift. In this blog we discuss the aspects of the idea and have proposed that it be computer modeled so that we gain a full picture of how effective it might be. We will update as we get new information about modeling activities. What you can do to help is become informed and inform others so that this idea is vetted and finds a way to becoming funded.

For more information about Dr. Peter L. Ward’s teachings on climate change go to: https://whyclimatechanges.com/; where an important side effect of erupted volcanic aerosols is ozone depletion after a short lived and relatively minor cooling phase.